All posts by jyotisingh

European Women in Technology: An Event Recap

European Women in Technology 2017 – an event with attendees from every corner of the continent, was held in November in Amsterdam, and so it was a great opportunity for women working in Uniface to be a part of the event. It was an excellent platform to enable the tech sector to connect, learn about what is going on around the industry and to be inspired by the many women achieving fulfilling and interesting careers in technology. 

Uniface Women in IT
The group of attendees from Uniface
In this blog, we take 3 perspectives from those who attended. First up, Jyoti Singh, Software Developer:

The two day conference consisted of multiple parallel sessions running: inspirational keynotes, personal and career development workshops, technical classes, and networking opportunities; in short it contained all you need to progress and flourish in the tech sector.

As a whole, the event was significant from following different perspectives:

  • Inspirational and Motivational – It was an incredible experience to hear and learn from successful people in tech about championing women, the importance of female role models, accelerating career, getting into the boardroom etc. Some very interesting talks were about how to build confidence, use the right body language and market yourself to maximize your potential. It was also very encouraging to see how many women are leading in their career along with taking charge of their Life-Work Balance and succeeding in ever-Changing Technology World. It was a perfect learning for a reflection on your own career and where you are heading. 
  • Be Tech-savvy – Few sessions were targeted on latest trends and emerging technology, some are listed below :
    • Big data – being one of the hottest buzzwords across industry, but despite the hype there are challenges of distributed data storage and how to store and process big data are not yet fully understood. There were some good analysis in the session about how to approach these challenges by dispelling some myths, pointing out the pros and cons of various solutions available on the market and giving some tips on building reliable data pipelines.
    • Augmented Reality (AR) – Explaining how to build with AR using tools such as- ARCore and ARKit and find out the potential of AR for innovation in marketing and in product. 
    • Build Chatbots – with Amazon Lex – Amazon Lex is an AWS service for building conversational interfaces for applications using voice and text. The session was explaining that with Amazon Lex, you can build sophisticated, natural language chatbots into your applications to create new user experiences. 
    • Browser Peer to Peer Connections – How to create a server-less Realtime multiplayer game using peer to peer connections in the browser, making use of the WebRTC and dart technology.
    • Transforming the World with Artificial Intelligence (AI) – the hottest topic in technology – AI is not scary and that it can even be the exact opposite. The session explained that how AI is already helping people to do amazing things. How AI is can be used in our daily lives. Example: intelligent machines, self driving cars, smart camera’s, your own digital personal assistant, ways to discover new forms of medical treatment & much more! 
    • IoT and the Cloud – how to leverage Amazon Web Services (AWS) to build a real connected product which includes securely ingesting and sending data to the cloud and enabling device-device communication.
  • Networking – Last but very important, it was a great opportunity to meet like minded people and build the connections. 

The entire event was truly inspiring and thought provoking, and here I would like to end writing with my favourite quote from the sessions:

Uniface Women in IT

Next is Krissie Towikromo, Marketing Analyst:

In my whole career in the IT industry this was the first time that I attended the European Women in Technology Conference 2017.  I went to this event with no baggage and no expectations.  I wondered: “why is there a need for such a big event for Women in IT?”  I was overwhelmed by the passionate, positive and uplifting stories from the speakers.  We heard great stories from IBM, Microsoft and Adidas, among others.

Uniface Women in IT

During the inspiring sessions women explained the path they followed to get where they are today. The workshops were fun as some of the sessions were interactive and attendees could really participate in them.  You could visit one of the 31 companies on the exhibition floor who were there to show off their solutions and recruit talented women.

The lack of woman in tech does exist in 2017, and talking to all these talented women made me again realize we are far from ‘there’ yet.

Finally, from Christy Hillebrink, Marketing Director:

In one way it’s a pity that such an event exists—highlighting the shortage of female talent in the field of IT. However, the same can be said for other industries as well. Teaching for example is an area where the number of women far outweigh the number of men. So while it feels strange to have a specific event on this topic, on the other hand, it’s great that the lack of women in IT functions is being put on the radar and being talked about. That can only lead to more awareness and action from women, men and companies alike.

The focus of the event was around diversity and inclusion—and how companies that operate with these foundations can find more success than if they aren’t actively working in these areas. For me personally, there were several takeaways, thoughts and inspiration that I would like to share (in completely random order):

  • School curriculum and the promotion of IT topics in education is severely limited and outdated. This hurts everyone.
  • Be a “learn it all” vs a “know it all” to empower others and advance in your own career.
  • IBM prediction: medical labs “on a chip” will trace disease and predict our health. Cool!
  • Diversity is more than gender and race, and building teams based on which talents individuals can bring to the table is an art form.
  • Tech tracks being led by women engineers (everything from AI to blockchain to machine learning and everything in between) underlined that embracing IT is an opportunity for everyone.

Uniface Women in IT

It was very unique to attend an IT event with so many women. While there is not a quick fix, or even a concrete solution for having more women in IT, events like this help create a step in the right direction.

 

Technology Highlights Google Cloud Next 2017

Google cloud next-2017 The largest Google developer and IT gathering in Amsterdam to explore the latest developments in cloud technology. A chance to engage with the foremost minds leading the cloud revolution and learn how the modern enterprise is benefiting from the latest in cloud technology in unprecedented ways. As usual for us one more way to keep up with technology.

We saw some very interesting new innovations (spanner and app maker to name two) and how they relate to application development in the cloud.

Given below are the other highlights of the technologies talked about during the event:

1) Microservices & Kubernetes:

Microservices – is an architectural style that structures an application as a collection of loosely coupled services, which implement business capabilities. It enables the continuous delivery/deployment of large, complex applications and enables an organization to evolve its technology stack and can develop and deploy faster. It’s an evolution of software development and deployment that embraces DevOps and containers and breaks applications down to smaller individual components.

The emerging combination of micro-service architectures, Docker containers, programmable infrastructure, cloud, and modern Continuous Delivery (CD) techniques have enabled a true paradigm shift for delivering business value through software development.

The combination of microservices and containers promotes a totally different vision of how services change application development.

Kubernetes – is an open-source system for automating deployment, scaling and management of containerized applications that was originally designed by Google and donated to the cloud native computing foundation. It aims to provide a “platform for automating deployment, scaling, and operations of application containers across clusters of hosts”. It supports a range of container tools, including Docker.

Technology Highlights in Google Cloud Next 2017

2) Choosing the right compute option in a cloud project: a decision tree

To understand the trade-offs and decide which models are the best fit for your systems as well as how the models map to Cloud services —Compute Engine, Container Engine, App Engine, cloud functions.

Compute Engine is an Infrastructure-as-a-Service. The developer has to create and configure their own virtual machine instances. It gives them more flexibility and generally costs much less than App Engine. The drawback is that the developer has to manage their app and virtual machines yourself.

Container Engine is another level above Compute Engine, i.e. it’s cluster of several Compute Engine instances which can be centrally managed.

App Engine is a Platform-as-a-Service. It means that the developer can simply deploy their code, and the platform does everything else for them.

Cloud Functions is a serverless computing service, the next level up from App Engine in terms of abstraction. It allows developers to deploy bite-size pieces of code that execute in response to different events, which may include HTTP requests, changes in Cloud Storage, etc.

Technology Highlights in Google Cloud Next 2017

3) Big data – Big data refers to data that would typically be too expensive to store, manage, and analyse using traditional (relational and/or monolithic) database systems. Usually, such systems are cost-inefficient because of their inflexibility for storing unstructured data (such as images, text, and video), accommodating “high-velocity” (real-time) data, or scaling to support very large (petabyte-scale) data volumes. There are new approaches to managing and processing big data, including Apache Hadoop and NoSQL database systems. However, those options often prove to be complex to deploy, manage, and use in an on-premise situation.

Cloud computing offers access to data storage, processing, and analytics on a more scalable, flexible, cost-effective, and even secure basis than can be achieved with an on-premise deployment.

Real Life Scrum: A Presentation to Technology Students in Amsterdam

On Tuesday December 1st, Uniface was invited to deliver a guest lecture at the Technical School in Amsterdam for the students who have ambition in the Technology area. From Uniface Berry Kuijer, JiaoJiao Xia and I were the representatives to share their knowledge, expertise and real-life experiences with the students.

The presentation started with an ‘Introduction of Uniface’ focusing on few key points, by Berry Kuijer:
-History and vision of Uniface
-Customers and the market span
-Business model
-Development and deployment
-A live Uniface application development demo

Next in line were Jiaojiao and I to give a presentation about “Scrum in Uniface lab.” We briefed the students about the software development methodology used for managing the product development in Uniface. First we explained how the agile-scrum methodology are being used in Uniface Lab, by maximizing the team’s ability to deliver quickly, to respond to emerging requirements and to adapt to evolving technologies and changes in market conditions.

Second part of the presentation was about showing the ‘bigger picture’ of scrum by giving a real life example and how to apply it in daily life. We gave an example of what started off as a simple story in the lab and then showed how it became more complex and larger because of additional requirements. We wanted the students to understand that in the “real world” of software development, you can’t always foresee everything in the beginning. With the example we gave—we realized more about the complexity of a feature and its impact on the existing software architecture while started working on the feature, and therefore how a particular requirement would than emerge bigger than it appeared before. There are of course many other examples of how things can change during the process of building software.

Uniface
Uniface Lecture Team

So we took them from defining the features (user stories) into the wish list (product backlog), proceeded by planning those into workable timeslots (sprints) while reviewing the progress on the daily scrums to present the finished result in the review or demo meeting. Concluding with the retrospective to reflect and learn how to improve the process by knowing what went well and what can be improved. This was emphasized while reviewing examples on how it worked in practice in our teams and with our product owners in Uniface. Finally, we told them that they could apply this methodology to their team assignments and their current studies or practices.

The presentation was well received by the students as the whole atmosphere was stimulated by interaction and interesting questions coming from the students. The concept of SCRUM was very clear and they could relate to our “real life” example when requirements change, get larger, etc. It was a great experience for us and we also believe that the students benefited from being exposed to the perspectives that the Uniface guest lecture team provided.

GDG DevFest, Amsterdam Edition

On October 10th 2015, Google had organized the biggest Google Tech related event in The Netherlands, located in Science park, the heart of science in Amsterdam. Uniface as one of the sponsors was invited to join the event. As the representing group of Uniface, the mobile development team attended the Google DevFest, an event carefully crafted for the developers by the Dutch GDG communities.

Uniface Mobile Dev Team
Uniface Mobile Dev Team

GDG DevFests are large, community-run events that can offer speaker sessions across multiple product areas, all-day hack-a-thons, code labs, and more. Google Developer Groups (GDGs) are for developers who are interested in Google’s developer technology; everything from the AndroidChromeDrive, and Google Cloud platforms.

A GDG can take many forms — from just a few people getting together to large gatherings with demos and tech talks, to events like code sprints and hackathons. However, at the core, GDGs are focused on developers and technical content, and the core audience are mainly developers.

Each GDG DevFest is inspired by and uniquely tailored to the needs of the developer community that hosts it. DevFest 2015 also had a series of speaker sessions and workshops for web, mobile and cloud solutions, glimpses of the sessions were about –

        Material coordination –a new design support library by Google, which helps bring a lot of material design components including a navigation drawer view, floating labels, floating action buttons, snack bars, and a new framework to tie motion and scroll events. The library is supported for Android version 2.1 and higher.

        Firebase : codeless backend for Android – Firebase is a cloud services provider and backend as a service . Firebase’s primary product is a realtime database which provides an API that allows developers to store and sync data across multiple clients.

        Google Cloud Endpoints and AngularJS -Google Cloud Endpoints consists of tools, libraries and capabilities that allow you to generate APIs and client libraries from an App Engine application, referred to as an API backend, to simplify client access to data from other applications. Endpoints makes it easier to create a web backend for web clients and mobile clients such as Android or Apple’s iOS.

        UI Router – It’s a routing framework that allows us to organize the interface by a state machine, rather than a simple URL route.

        Polymer – library makes it easier than ever to make fast, beautiful, and interoperable web components.

 Last but not least, and most importantly, being a sponsor, we also had an opportunity to provide a short pitch and say something about Uniface to the developer groups. The pitch was very nicely outlined and well presented by Thomas Stolwijk.

Uniface
Uniface Sponsor Pitch