Tag Archives: scrum

Undercutting – Using SCRUM sprints to strategically beat the competition as pit stops do in F1

f1-scrum

Good luck Max Verstappen (twitter:@Max33Verstappen) on getting podium places at USA and Mexico after the great achievements of Malaysia and Japan!

As said before, the pit stops improved. By incorporating all developments in technology as well as fine-tuning the roles within the team the pit stops were made as efficient as possible “difficult to beat 1.9 seconds”.  All in all, pit stops contributed the most when used strategically to win races; that means that based on the efficiency level attained on a perfectly synchronized process with flawless collaboration of the team, the squads gained an advantage of 26 seconds over the opponents. 

Without going into the overall strategy, rest assured that making the team work efficiently is not a mere milestone, it is constant practice and sharp focus from all involved members including the crucial factor of trust. As Michael Schumacher said – “When you start out in a team, you have to get the teamwork going and then you get something back.”

In that sense, at Uniface our teams have reached the level of efficiency which allows us to release our software on many platforms and for two different versions of the product every scrum sprint (every 2 weeks). We can still improve and we keep on doing that as KAIZEN are part of our DNA nowadays. And the biggest achievement we see is, as in F1, being able to apply that predictable process to the overall strategy.

f1-scrum

Let me go back to what happened at the F1 with the pit stop, once the team had mastered the level of efficiency, the squad decided to think out of the box and not concentrate only on the pit stop but on the overall performance of the race. At Uniface, we are aligning the business with IT to look at the overall strategy, although we still improve our SCRUM ceremonies. We think that the areas where we will gain the most are vision, strategy, roadmap, backlog management and overall in open two-way communication. I’ll keep you updated with the progress on this fascinating project. Remember, undercutting is the art of knowing when the competitor will stop or come back to the race so that you can intentionally beat him or her by planning your own pit stop accordingly.

In my opinion, we need to make the most out of the well-performed process of delivering software to use the ever-changing priorities and hit the market with the software our customers/prospects need on time. We come from an 18-month cycle (~78 weeks) to a 2-week cycle to release software, now we need to use that to strategically deliver what helps our customers the most… in a changing world.

f1-scrum

Food for thought
The following table is an attempt to compare pit stops and scrum sprints, I know it is not perfect but its intention is to spark thoughts. Let me know what your think about it. Enjoy!

Pit stops Symmetry SCRUM Sprints
Used in Race strategy Goal is to win Used in Delivery strategy
Execution of the pit stop Synchronized perfection Sprint work
Pit crew Highly trained technical members Development team
Team / squad Harmonious collaboration Scrum team
Preparation

Changing tires

Refueling

Adjusting car

Tasks mastered by the team Architecture

Coding

Testing

Delivering stories

Choreography Coordination Swarming
Collaboration Communication Collaboration
Changing rules Adapt / Fast response Changing requirements

 

SCRUM to strategically win from the competition as pit stops do in F1

Congratulations to Max Verstappen on winning the Malaysian Grand Prix last weekend. You see, strategy pays out when everything falls into place.

Uniface Formula 1

So, my drive 😉 is to apply scrum in your business strategy to win the race too.

So in F1 the pit stop, besides being a masterly synchronized ballet of disciplined execution and expertise, the pit stop is used strategically by the team to win the race. How? The amount of pit stops depends on the desired lap time while gauging fuel consumption, tire wearing out, undercutting (taking over a car while making the pit stop or leaving one). With the above in mind the team determines to use certain amount of pit stops, or to add one more in order to win.

In SCRUM terms, the sprints are the perfectly synchronized production of software which can be strategically used to deliver value to our customers. Whether we deliver features gradually or change the order of delivery as to meet business value.

Here at Uniface, we are busy trying to get SCRUM to the next level where alignment between business and IT are essential to make a difference. We must be aligned to adapt to change and therefore better serve our customers. In that context, we already have a track record as we have been using SCRUM for more than 9 years and have done the necessary improvements to the processes ourselves.

As an example, we have even invented our own ceremony to facilitate the alignment among teams called  a Sprint Pitch (an already 3-year-old ceremony for us).

To stress why aligning the business with IT is important, I want to emphasize the analogy from the F1 championships; I was inspired to use it when watching a Red Bull documentary about “The history of the pit stop” during my last flight.

You know the thrill of changing tires and refueling the car in the shortest amount of time possible?

In the early days, the pit stop was just a pause that took up to a minute, there was no changing of tires. That came in the 1970’s when an unplanned pit stop to change tires would take 3 to 5 minutes. In the early 1980’s Gordon Murray turned them into the strategic pit stops, considering the car weight, the tire degradation and saw a relation on how all that influenced lap times. At that moment another race began, the one to bring the pit stop’s time down to the minimum. In order, to use the pit stop more strategically and make the time necessary for a pit stop negligible.

Well, it is no surprise that to reach the shortest time, it took analysis, collaboration, improvements to get to the changing of the tires or better even the entire wheel set and refueling the car, cooling the car’s engine in just under 2 seconds. Bear in mind that actually it takes a crew of 18 to 20 highly skilled individuals to handle a pit stop.

You may wonder how do we do that in SCRUM at Uniface, but first time for a pit stop … (to be continued)!